Lydia Saunders Graduate

Loughborough University
Human Factors Engineer

Up until now

I started by learning about the urban railway, specifically the London Underground, and our products. Once I’d mastered the basics, I moved into project work and was surprised how quickly I was given responsibility. I really feel that I’ve found my bearings within the rail sector and am now Human Factors lead on a number of projects. Away from my day job, I was part of the winning team in the Association of Project Management Challenge for the Thames Valley region and recently won a trip to the Thales Singapore site as the winner of the Thales video selfie competition!

THE HUMAN DIMENSION

For the last year, I’ve worked on the Human Machine Interface (HMI) design for a communication system to be fitted on each workstation in the new control room for the 4 Lines Modernisation programme. I’m working with our Software team in Cheadle to ensure that designs we create from a Human Factors perspective can be implemented in the software in line with customer and end user requirements. It’s been a great learning experience in terms of interpreting requirements into a design, organising my time, and understanding product and project lifecycles – best of all, I can now present confidently to both small and large groups, internally and externally.

THRIVING GRADUATE COMMUNITY

The Thales graduate community is highly active in London, and we also meet up with graduates in Crawley for larger out of office social events. The social life at Thales has been fantastic for me, having moved down to London after graduating and knowing few people outside work. There are plenty of team socials, which are a lot of fun and make for a stronger working team. I’m also getting involved in Thales Social Media, which is really interesting. We’re in the early stages of planning to source and create content specifically for Early Careers (apprentices, students and graduates).

JUST GO FOR IT!

That’s my advice if you’re thinking of applying. The best thing about Thales is the constant flow of new opportunities. I tend to say ‘yes’ to anything that presents itself as that’s the best way to push myself and learn new things. Your career here is your own – what you do or don’t do to develop yourself is down to you. But I would say, make sure you understand the full complexity of Thales, not just the business unit you’re applying to – you could end up moving round the company after your graduate scheme.

Lydia Saunders

Graduate

Loughborough University
Human Factors Engineer

Up until now

I started by learning about the urban railway, specifically the London Underground, and our products. Once I’d mastered the basics, I moved into project work and was surprised how quickly I was given responsibility. I really feel that I’ve found my bearings within the rail sector and am now Human Factors lead on a number of projects. Away from my day job, I was part of the winning team in the Association of Project Management Challenge for the Thames Valley region and recently won a trip to the Thales Singapore site as the winner of the Thales video selfie competition!

THE HUMAN DIMENSION

For the last year, I’ve worked on the Human Machine Interface (HMI) design for a communication system to be fitted on each workstation in the new control room for the 4 Lines Modernisation programme. I’m working with our Software team in Cheadle to ensure that designs we create from a Human Factors perspective can be implemented in the software in line with customer and end user requirements. It’s been a great learning experience in terms of interpreting requirements into a design, organising my time, and understanding product and project lifecycles – best of all, I can now present confidently to both small and large groups, internally and externally.

THRIVING GRADUATE COMMUNITY

The Thales graduate community is highly active in London, and we also meet up with graduates in Crawley for larger out of office social events. The social life at Thales has been fantastic for me, having moved down to London after graduating and knowing few people outside work. There are plenty of team socials, which are a lot of fun and make for a stronger working team. I’m also getting involved in Thales Social Media, which is really interesting. We’re in the early stages of planning to source and create content specifically for Early Careers (apprentices, students and graduates).

JUST GO FOR IT!

That’s my advice if you’re thinking of applying. The best thing about Thales is the constant flow of new opportunities. I tend to say ‘yes’ to anything that presents itself as that’s the best way to push myself and learn new things. Your career here is your own – what you do or don’t do to develop yourself is down to you. But I would say, make sure you understand the full complexity of Thales, not just the business unit you’re applying to – you could end up moving round the company after your graduate scheme.

Back to Profile

I started by learning about the urban railway, specifically the London Underground, and our products. Once I’d mastered the basics, I moved into project work and was surprised how quickly I was given responsibility. I really feel that I’ve found my bearings within the rail sector and am now Human Factors lead on a number of projects. Away from my day job, I was part of the winning team in the Association of Project Management Challenge for the Thames Valley region and recently won a trip to the Thales Singapore site as the winner of the Thales video selfie competition!

For the last year, I’ve worked on the Human Machine Interface (HMI) design for a communication system to be fitted on each workstation in the new control room for the 4 Lines Modernisation programme. I’m working with our Software team in Cheadle to ensure that designs we create from a Human Factors perspective can be implemented in the software in line with customer and end user requirements. It’s been a great learning experience in terms of interpreting requirements into a design, organising my time, and understanding product and project lifecycles – best of all, I can now present confidently to both small and large groups, internally and externally.

The Thales graduate community is highly active in London, and we also meet up with graduates in Crawley for larger out of office social events. The social life at Thales has been fantastic for me, having moved down to London after graduating and knowing few people outside work. There are plenty of team socials, which are a lot of fun and make for a stronger working team. I’m also getting involved in Thales Social Media, which is really interesting. We’re in the early stages of planning to source and create content specifically for Early Careers (apprentices, students and graduates).

That’s my advice if you’re thinking of applying. The best thing about Thales is the constant flow of new opportunities. I tend to say ‘yes’ to anything that presents itself as that’s the best way to push myself and learn new things. Your career here is your own – what you do or don’t do to develop yourself is down to you. But I would say, make sure you understand the full complexity of Thales, not just the business unit you’re applying to – you could end up moving round the company after your graduate scheme.